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Green Custom Home Builder | Thursday Two Questions #19

Living green is a wide spread trend and purpose for many young professionals. Some of our associates have already sought to build or live in homes that are environmentally sustainable. The future seemed to be in dire need of more conscientious consumers when it comes to choosing things we touch and use.

It is interesting that while there are many home builders, there are few that are interested in preserving our green future. Mark Johnson, Wilmington NC builders is one that is committed beyond just one or two green items when building custom homes. Some home builders will build homes as fasts as possible and throw in an item that is considered environmentally friendly as their primary selling point and call their homes green dwellings.

Learn about the green construction of custom build homes on the Mark Johnson home builder website. There is a growing need to contribute in preserving the environment. This builder focuses on sustainability, health, safety and efficiencies. The website contains a wealth of information on how to get started, and answers what to expect regarding the designing process, and construction phase.

For a quick peek and summary watch the Green Building video presentation of the first Leed Platinum certified home. Leed Platinum certification is a third party certification program and the nationally accepted benchmark for the design, construction and operation of high-performance green buildings.

Mark Johnson home builder has achieved the highest green building that promotes a sustainability performance in five key areas of environmental health: sustainable site development, water savings, energy efficiency, materials selection and indoor environmental quality. The home that you see in the video is 44% more efficient than a standard home, which result in significant energy savings and about 110 thousand gallons of water a year! The home is built upon concrete form and is impervious to mold growth.

I have not heard of metal buildings, nor the underground collection of rain water until today, but both have impressed me wildly. Such as California is always in drought it seems, I wondered had we considered building more underground collection of rain water to aid in this ongoing problem.

This is one of many green movements and unique systems a Leed Platinum home is built upon. The choices to choose fixtures such as Kohler toilets, or bamboo flooring are a few other conscientious designs that Mark Johnson homes are proud to incorporate.

Images are courtesy of www.markjohnsoncustomhomes.com website.

Here are my Thursday Two Questions #19:
1) Have you heard of the Leed Platinum Certified homes?
2) What are your thoughts about the environment and the sustainability materials in home building?


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15 comments :

  1. 1. No, I've never heard of Leed Platinum Certified Homes.
    2. I'm all for environment and sustainability materials, though I think they are probably cost inhibitive right now. Our electricity was off this evening and my husband and I got to talking about the Azores island on which he was raised. Nearly everything, from the way they cooked (in big open hearths), grew and fished for their own food, etc., was environmentally friendly and, better yet, not dependent on electricity or gas. It was a simple life. No television, no light besides candles at night. He said they'd tell stories, visit with neighbors, go to bed early. Wow. The simple life!

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  2. 1) I haven't heard of Leed Platinum Certified homes.

    2) I like to do my bit in cutting down the footprints in our environment, and if I'm building a house, sustainable materials are what I would opt for..

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  3. Do I must live in a cave or what? No, I'm not familiar with Leed Platinum Certified homes.

    Usually when you're talking about environmental materials in homes then I envision greater expense. Somethings considered "green" would be of interest to me, but not at giving me greater pains as we don't have much green in our pocketbook.


    http://cathykennedystories.blogspot.com/2011/01/whats-in-kiss-thursday2q.html

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  4. Interesting topic - I haven't heard of the Leed Platinum Certified homes before but I know that if we were to build our own home right now that I would love to incorporate sustainable materials. In fact, at some point we'll probably replace the wood flooring that we have in parts of our home right now and I'd love to check out bamboo, I've heard good things!

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  5. 1. No.

    2. One of my friends is a family of architects who does green architecture. It can be expensive but investments, especially for your home, is a practical expense.

    We opt for "green" living. Less use of electricity (when I'm home and not using the PC the only electricity running is the ref!), recycling waste (we have bins for paper, bottles, cans, etc. and the dogs poo goes back to the garden as compost! Ha!) and simpler life like Margaret's conversations, playtime (I love to run around with my dogs), walking, writing, painting, etc.

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  6. My internet connection was acting up last night so I'm catching up now.

    I have never heard of Leed Platinum Certified homes before now. It sounds very interesting.

    I think it is an excellent idea. We bought an older home which we love but it was not the most environmentaly friendly house. We are gradually replacing fixtures to help make it so.

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  7. 1. I have not heard about the Leed Platinum Certified homes.

    2. I'm glad that they are building homes with sustainable materials, however it will have to be gradual because they seem to be more expensive.
    If I was buying a home now I'd probably read up more on the matter.

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  8. I haven't heard of Leed Platinum Certified home before, and if I have, I can't afford it anyway!

    Thanks for a great information to know!

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  9. @Margaret Duartesound like the simple life, no electricity? I don't think I can survive.

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  10. @♥-Icy BC-♥I wish too, one day, I will have a green, sustainable house, with underground water retainer. :-)

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  11. @Cathy KennedyIt could a more expensive but the idea is to protect our world, the future. Also the upfront expense is supposed to minimize future expenses. But I understand what you mean.

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  12. @XeniaAt least do the bamboos flooring, it could save you tons of steam cleaning for the carpets.

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  13. @SquirrelQueen It seemed that the Leed Platinum is new to most everyone. But unanimously everyone would try to go green if it is affordable.

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  14. @JamericanSpiceBuying a home is a big investment, so it is natural to do a lot of research before hand.

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  15. @★Mumsy★You are not alone, it seemed most people think green homes are very expensive to build.

    ReplyDelete

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