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How to Grow Mango From Seed

Mango is delicious. When selecting mangoes at the market, I look for the full body, red and firm. As with anything, if I like it enough, I would want to grow it for myself. Mango is better for you than any fiber pills, and has higher potassium than potatoes. Read about the 3 Health Benefits of Mango and Mango with Perilla Mint Salad.

To grow Mango from seed is very simple, but you have to follow the rules. It has to be just the right temperature and moisture. If you try it in water alone, it will go rotten. For me, it has been trials and errors, but the method that works for everyone including myself is below.

You will need: paper towel, snack bag, knife.

Steps:

1) After the mango has been eaten, clear out all the fruit flesh and turn it sideways.
2) You will see a seam, carefully push the edge of the knife into the crack at the corner and start moving the knife along the seam line. When you can feel the knife has punctured through the seam, enter the knife deeper and gently cut along the line until you can open the Mango seed.
3) Slowly pry the Mango seed seems open and careful not to cut / damage the seed inside.
4) Once you have open the entire seam, go ahead and spread the sides with your thumbs. Reach in and gently take the seed out. You will see is a large seed like figure 3 below.

2)3)

5) At this time grab the paper towel and wet it thoroughly, but not soaking. If you happened to soak the paper towel, you can wring it. Wrap the seed in the wet paper towel like figure 4.
6) Put the wrapped seed in a sandwich/ snack Ziploc bag.
7) Place the sealed Ziploc bag by the kitchen window.
8) Check the paper towel every two to three days to make sure it is still wet and moist. And spray it wet again, if necessary.
9) About a week, you will see some roots and growth from the seed. At this time you may choose to place it in a pot with soil, it doesn't matter how you place the seed in the soil. The amazing seed/ roots will find its way to multiply.
10) Or if you prefer, the seed can be left for a few more weeks and you will see the seed forming leaflets like figure 6, 7. You will now know which end to place down in the pot.

4)5)

6)7)

Thanks for stopping by today. 
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27 comments :

  1. gee, you are so good, i did not know how to do this though we have mango tree back home in the philippines, i simply saw new seedlings showing up on the ground, i love mango, one of my favorite fruit.

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    Replies
    1. Oh my! You're making me envious. New seedling on the ground? I love mango too. I hope to be able to actually reap from its fruits soon.

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  2. Thanks for the great information! I'm sharing it with my friends at facebook..

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anytime. I think if anything it is a great experiment and a fantastic science project for the kids.

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  3. This is wonderful! I have been thinking about growing it, but I know our weather in Michigan wouldn't tolerate this tropical fruit. Stumbled!

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    Replies
    1. Yes. Michigan is a bit harsh, you will have to keep it inside in the winter and try to bring it back out in the summer.

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  4. Seriously that is impressive. I can't even grow a marigold from a seed! Stopping in to Follow you on Friday - hope you can visit and return the favor soon! http://www.shaunanosler.blogspot.com/

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    Replies
    1. Thanks! I do have a very inquisitive mind for propagation and growing from seed.

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  5. Didn't know about this..good to know information!

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    Replies
    1. Great, that you like it! I am totally happy about growing fruit trees.

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  6. I love mango! We used to have a mango tree in our garden when I was a little girl.

    I used to climb it to pick the green mangoes, which we had with pepper and salt. It was totally delicious!

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    Replies
    1. My family members are mango nuts. We like them firm and kind of green too! WE put the red garlic sauce on them , and oh my gosh, my mouth is watering right now.

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  7. shared it to facebook!!!
    I thank you so much for linking in this week. It is an honor to host Friday's Flaunt and meet new friends and visit the regulars (who are like old friends) who share. I am always excited to tour each post and see the different flowers/ projects and garden art that everyone flaunts. It is a pleasure to tour and see all the gorgeous blooms...and I appreciate each and every link and comment! I hope you will link in again soon!
    (¯`v´¯)
    `*.¸.*´Glenda/Tootsie
    ¸.•´¸.•*¨) ¸.•*¨)
    (¸.•´ (¸.•´ .•´ ¸¸.•¨¯`•.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes. I just have trouble remembering all the memes! Thanks for stopping by, love your signature.

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  8. This is very cool, I plan on growing a mango tree that I can keep indoors : )

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    1. Hey, it is not a bad idea. The green leaflets are very pretty.

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  9. I would love to do this. I'm thinking if we live here long enoough I'd do this. I love having ftuit trees but there's no space here.

    In my country we eat mangoes all the time!

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    Replies
    1. I think New Orleans is not a bad place to try and grow the mangoes. It might just make it in that temperature.

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  10. Amanda, that is so interesting. How big have you actually grown plants? I picture huge mango trees like I've seen in the Caribbean and Hawaii, lush with fruit. Of course, I doubt that they would get that big where you live. If so, invite me to harvest some of the fruit. I love mango!!! I'm hoping I'll be eating my fill in Hawaii.

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    Replies
    1. Oh, not very big. But I have been known to drop my projects when other pressing things come my way. I will try it again after my next mango though.

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    2. I just finished following your very clear instrutions. If I am successful in getting my seed to grow I plan on taking it to New Orleans where my son lives and plant it there. We all love mango, and I make mango chutney. Thanks

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    3. So cool. It worked for me the very first time, so I wish you success too. It's like anything, if you're into it, it shall reward you. I love mangoes so much for its health benefits and taste.

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  11. When you moisten the paper towel what water temperature do you use?

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    Replies
    1. Hi there, great question. I used warm water. Not cold and not hot. Cold and hot temperatures will shock the seed, or really any type of plant. Try to use water that is on the warm/cold side.

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  12. Hi, to only downfall is all modern mangos are grafted. You can grow the seed and graft on later to get a nice edible mango. Otherwise they will be bitter and fibery

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  13. Thanks for your instructional post. I'll do that next time :)

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  14. Awesome!! it worked for me a bunch of times.

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